Results 1 to 10 of 10
  1. #1
    25+ Posting Member



    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Suffolk, UK
    Posts
    42
    Contribute If you enjoy reading the
    content here, click the below
    image to support MyCockpit site.
    Click Here To Contribute To Our Site

    Building an Embraer 195 Cockpit

    PART 1

    A couple of years ago I decided to replace my old generic simulator, and I thought that the E-Jets looked interesting.

    The cockpit layout and controls seemed ideal for home construction. The MFD and Eicas selections are controlled by a touchpad and there are no multi segment displays or rotary gauges. Button and switch actions are shown on the MIP displays.



    I checked out the Feelthere E-Jets v2 and was surprised how good it is. It models the systems correctly, has a range of 2D panels and it runs well in P3D (v2.2). Functions are easily assignable to hardware using FSUIPC and the flight model is very believable.

    It looked possible to build a reasonable Ejet simulation without any complex programming, for which I have no ability, so I started collecting materials.

    Available space did not allow a complete cockpit, or wrap around view, so a perfect replica was not possible. My aim was to make a "cost effective" E-Jet simulator, which would feel reasonably realistic in use.



    For simplicity I decided to run with the single computer from the old sim, an i7 2600K running at 4.5 with a couple of SSDs. I later upgraded the primary graphics card to a GTX 970. The instrument monitors also came from the old sim. The outside view is on a 47 inch HD television.

    Starting the build

    There are around 170 functional buttons and switches, mounted in 27 switch panels, so I began with these. The panels were scaled from multiple photos of real cockpits and produced using Serif Draw Plus 4. They were printed on white self adhesive photo paper, mounted on 4mm acrylic, and covered with a clear adhesive film to protect the printed surfaces.



    I wanted backlighting, so I used 2 printed layers to avoid light bleed. The first with a black background and the second with the grey background, something I learnt from this website.



    The trick is aligning both layers exactly to avoid a fuzzy effect when backlit. The result is much sharper than it looks here, but difficult to show in a photo because digital cameras struggle in low light.




    Part 2 next.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  2. Thanks mariocastillodelpino thanked for this post
    Likes skino, mariocastillodelpino liked this post
  3. #2
    25+ Posting Member



    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Suffolk, UK
    Posts
    42
    Contribute If you enjoy reading the
    content here, click the below
    image to support MyCockpit site.
    Click Here To Contribute To Our Site

    Re: Building an Embraer 195 Cockpit

    PART 2

    Main structure

    I followed standard practice, using mdf, and building in modules for easy installation.

    MIP



    White paint in recesses is to improve backlighting.





    Detachable overlays for instruments





    As it will be single pilot operation, I made a couple of changes from the real MIP.
    I moved the standby attitude indicator across to the right of the Eicas screen.
    I can still see it, and it allowed the gear lever to be moved to the left, where it is easily reached.






    Windscreen is clear acrylic sheet with wood and mdf framing. Width is a bit less than full size to fit available space.



    The centre pillar incorporates 2 steel supports which go over the top where they are welded to the brackets which hold the overhead panel.

    next part 3
    Attached Images Attached Images

  4. #3
    25+ Posting Member



    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Suffolk, UK
    Posts
    42
    Contribute If you enjoy reading the
    content here, click the below
    image to support MyCockpit site.
    Click Here To Contribute To Our Site

    Re: Building an Embraer 195 Cockpit

    PART 3

    Control Column

    Built mainly from mdf with some sections in plywood for strength.



    Column and yoke pivot on 12mm silver steel shafts with ball races and nylon thrust washers. This gives a very smooth and solid feel to control movements.



    Bearings fit in recesses bored in the wood and are "stuck" with thread locking compound around the circumference. I used the steel shafts to ensure
    alignment while it set.



    The woodwork looks quite crude until it's finished and painted.

    Ailerons are centred by coils springs attached to an arm fixed on the spindle, together with a disc with an indent, which engages with a spring loaded ball in the centre position.

    Gas struts give a more weighty feel to the elevator, but contrary to popular belief, they do not provide any centring effect. This is achieved by strong coil springs. Greasing them avoids spring noise.

    I tried a spring loaded roller in base of control column, running on a track, with an indent for the centre, but it resulted in sticky elevator movement, so I removed it.




    Ailerons and elevators use geared pots, connected to a BU0836A interface, inside the control column. This also takes the yoke buttons, so there is only one USB connection.


    Part 4 next
    Attached Images Attached Images

  5. #4
    300+ Forum Addict Avro748's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    At the Controls
    Posts
    359
    Contribute If you enjoy reading the
    content here, click the below
    image to support MyCockpit site.
    Click Here To Contribute To Our Site

    Re: Building an Embraer 195 Cockpit

    Cool build! By the way, is that the Routech control column head? If so, how much did it cost?

  6. #5
    25+ Posting Member



    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Suffolk, UK
    Posts
    42
    Contribute If you enjoy reading the
    content here, click the below
    image to support MyCockpit site.
    Click Here To Contribute To Our Site

    Re: Building an Embraer 195 Cockpit

    Thanks Avro.
    The control column is entirely self built so it cost very little. Probably about 80 in total.
    I'm just about to post the yoke pictures. I ran out of time last night.

  7. #6
    25+ Posting Member



    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Suffolk, UK
    Posts
    42
    Contribute If you enjoy reading the
    content here, click the below
    image to support MyCockpit site.
    Click Here To Contribute To Our Site

    Re: Building an Embraer 195 Cockpit

    PART 4

    The Yoke

    The E-Jet yoke is very distinctive, but relatively easy to make from laminated mdf.




    A lot of shaping, sanding, acrylic primer and car body filler and more sanding.


    Wiring is hidden under cover plate.

    I substituted a view hat switch for the real world PTT button on the left, and added the red button on the right side as a sim pause button.

    The yoke is a tight fit on the shaft and is secured by a metal dowel.

    Trim switch is a double pole centre sprung rocker. I removed the rocker part, drilled a couple of holes and screwed a piece of wood on top. Reshaped it and finished with car body filler, sprayed and refitted. The side guards are pvc. Switch feels realistic in operation.


    I found some patterned vinyl fabric to use for the handgrips.


    An old fridge magnet was right size and shape for an Embraer motif.

    A shower hose outer covering works as the cable protector.

    next part 5
    Attached Images Attached Images

  8. Thanks POTKC thanked for this post
    Likes POTKC, munjaki liked this post
  9. #7
    New Member



    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Berlin, Germany
    Posts
    4
    Contribute If you enjoy reading the
    content here, click the below
    image to support MyCockpit site.
    Click Here To Contribute To Our Site

    Re: Building an Embraer 195 Cockpit

    Absolutely great! Awesome build with great detail...

    I got a question: you mentioned the Wilco E-Jets for Prepar3D as the used flight model. Due to the fact that I am building a regional liner cockpit close to the ERJ145 I try to integrate Wilco's ERJ at the moment (Prepard3D V3). Problem is there are no fsuipc offsets available and mouse macros don't cover all switches, not to say the outputs for the panel annunciators etc.
    So can you confirm Wilco made offsets for the E-Jets available?

    Regards!
    AgCFSX - advanced generic cockpit for FSX
    www.gc-fsx.de

  10. #8
    25+ Posting Member



    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Suffolk, UK
    Posts
    42
    Contribute If you enjoy reading the
    content here, click the below
    image to support MyCockpit site.
    Click Here To Contribute To Our Site

    Re: Building an Embraer 195 Cockpit

    Thanks capkalu,
    first I should just mention that Wilco were only the publishers. The E-Jets and ERJ 145 were actually developed by FeelThere.

    I'm not sure that any offsets were made available for either aircraft. I did consider using the ERJ 145, but like you I found a few things that were difficult or impossible to achieve successfully, whereas the E-Jet allowed everything to be achieved with mouse macros.

    Feelthere do have a support forum, but it's not very active and support is limited. It can be accessed through simflight.com. It's a sub forum. It's certainly worth asking them.

    John B.

  11. #9
    Executive Assistant Geremy Britton's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    North,East England
    Posts
    1,597
    Contribute If you enjoy reading the
    content here, click the below
    image to support MyCockpit site.
    Click Here To Contribute To Our Site

    Re: Building an Embraer 195 Cockpit

    Wow, excellent work! That yoke is brilliant. What a credit to you.
    Best Regards
    Geremy Britton
    Executive Assistant, MyCockpit Inc
    Head of GLB Flight Products
    www.geremy.co.uk

  12. #10
    25+ Posting Member



    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Suffolk, UK
    Posts
    42
    Contribute If you enjoy reading the
    content here, click the below
    image to support MyCockpit site.
    Click Here To Contribute To Our Site

    Re: Building an Embraer 195 Cockpit

    Thanks Geremy. There don't seem to be so many people making their own components these days. The older ones among us started with building model aircraft many years ago and developed the necessary skills that way. It makes it possible to build a reasonably cost effective simulator.

    I admire the professionally produced cockpit units that many people now use. They look and feel superb, but at considerable cost. Unfortunately the realism is still not quite matched by flightsim software, even with the best addons, though things are improving slowly.

    I look forward to the day when we are not limited by inefficient software dragging down performance, then we can really make the most of our cockpits.

    jbee.