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  1. #1
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    Making your own frames using Aluminium soldering

    Hi all

    I'll mention a new method to make your own frames or other cockpit parts from aluminum, using alu soldering
    This method use only simple DIY tools and a special Alu solder, so no expensive tools

    There are two rules to mention: keep the heat in the material and not in the vice or clamp and break the oxide layer proper

    I started with the after OH frame, next will be the FWD OH frame

    See attached pictures

    For how to see this video: Alutite - soldering aluminum - YouTube


    If you have any questions or need more information over the solder please send me a PM.

    Best regards

    Jan Geurtsen
    Attached Images Attached Images

  2. #2
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    Re: Making your own frames using Aluminium soldering

    That looks very tempting. But it seems too easy. What are the negatives? Does it take lots of practice? There's a narrow window of aluminum temperatures between the melting point of the solder and the aluminum itself--is that a problem?

    Can you use a copper pipe welding blow torch or does it require a special torch?

  3. #3
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    Re: Making your own frames using Aluminium soldering

    Quote Originally Posted by NedHamilton View Post
    That looks very tempting. But it seems too easy. What are the negatives? Does it take lots of practice? There's a narrow window of aluminum temperatures between the melting point of the solder and the aluminum itself--is that a problem?

    Can you use a copper pipe welding blow torch or does it require a special torch?
    Hi Ned,

    It's easy,not a lot of practice needed.
    The melting point of the aluminium is a lot higher, the solder is melting at 380 degrees celsius.
    Because of that you can use a DIY blow torch.
    The only thing you keep in mind is that the heat must be kept in the material, and not transferd to your vice or clamp
    so some isolation between the parts and the vice/clamp is requierd.
    Jan

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    Re: Making your own frames using Aluminium soldering

    And you can see when the aluminum is hot enough because the solder will melt when touched to the metal, then run beads along the joint, and then clean up the bead with a cold tool--is that what he was doing in the video?? Do you think the welds are strong enough to do something as ambitious as this:

    Attachment 7043

  5. #5
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    Re: Making your own frames using Aluminium soldering

    Quote Originally Posted by NedHamilton View Post
    And you can see when the aluminum is hot enough because the solder will melt when touched to the metal, then run beads along the joint, and then clean up the bead with a cold tool--is that what he was doing in the video?? Do you think the welds are strong enough to do something as ambitious as this:

    Attachment 7043
    Hi Ned,

    Yes thats what it is. You can heat up the tool a bit.
    The attachment gives a fault

    Jan

  6. #6
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    Matt Olieman's Avatar
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    Re: Making your own frames using Aluminium soldering

    Within the past couple of years, someone here used this method to build the frame work for a pedestal, also showed pics. I was quite impressed at the time. Unfortunately I can't seem to locate the posts....

    Matt Olieman

  7. #7
    25+ Posting Member RojanTrojan's Avatar
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    Re: Making your own frames using Aluminium soldering

    Thats very impressive. It looks very strong once cooled too. Will have to look into this. I agree with others it looks to...well...easy.

    Thanks for sharing.

    Rhydian

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    300+ Forum Addict Shawn's Avatar
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    Re: Making your own frames using Aluminium soldering

    I have used this rod for welding aluminum and I can tell you the joint is actually stronger than the aluminium itself. The product must be melted by the heat of the part and not the actual torch, if you use the torch to melt the rod onto the joint it won't fuse. After the initial application you can melt the rod with the torch to build up a broken part, it's amazing stuff actually.

    edit: the only drawback to the product is that if you are trying to connect a number of parts close together it has to be done all at the same time. If the joint is heated back up the bead will liquefy and release. For an overhead panel it wouldn't be an issue as long as the cross members were far enough apart.

  9. Likes Jan737 liked this post