Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
    300+ Forum Addict manhattan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Plymouth UK
    Posts
    347
    Contribute If you enjoy reading the
    content here, click the below
    image to support MyCockpit site.
    Click Here To Contribute To Our Site

    NEW BUILDER for the 737....

    Hello 737 builders!

    I would like to switch to building a 737...BUT..

    Can anybody tell me just how much of the mass of switches etc found in the overhead and elsewhere, need to be understood for a simmer to build and run a cockpit?
    It would be all too easy to put up a load of dummy switches etc, but on the other hand, without a CPL, or a very intensive course, what else can be done?
    I am sure that there are some out there that have full knowledge of everything in the flight deck, but is this typical?
    What do most simmers do?

    TONY, Plymouth UK

  2. #2
    10+ Posting Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Leamington Spa
    Posts
    22
    Contribute If you enjoy reading the
    content here, click the below
    image to support MyCockpit site.
    Click Here To Contribute To Our Site

    Re: NEW BUILDER for the 737....

    Dear Tony,

    I bought a copy of Bill Bulfers 737 Cockpit Companion (http://www.cockpitcompanion.com/serv...Cockpit/Detail) on eBay and have found it invaluable. I started by working through 737 normal checklists and when I came across a switch that I wasn't familiar with looked it up. It is surprising how quickly you get familiar with things.

    There is some very good information here: http://www.smartcockpit.com/plane/boeing/B737/

    & here: http://www.737ng.co.uk/ - have alook in the downloads section.

    I am using ProSim http://prosim737.com/ for my build - it is absolutely fantastic.

    Another great resource is at http://www.flyaoamedia.com/ but this is a subscription service and the 737 course is not yet complete - the videos so far are excellent.

    Regards,

    Philip, Leamington UK

  3. Thanks manhattan thanked for this post
  4. #3
    150+ Forum Groupie
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    N/A
    Posts
    211
    Contribute If you enjoy reading the
    content here, click the below
    image to support MyCockpit site.
    Click Here To Contribute To Our Site

    Re: NEW BUILDER for the 737....

    Most switches should be interfaced (connected) in my opinion. Here's the switches you don't need (but they are on the "nice to have" list):

    All switches on the NAV panel (FMC on capt, both or F/O and so on), found directly above the fuel pump panel
    The window wipers
    The CB panel light knob
    The "panel" light knob (both light knobs could be connected to physical lights though)
    No smoking sign
    Equip heater switches
    ALT HORN cutout
    All the temperature switches and the "thermometer switch" (controls the uppermost, rightmost gauge)
    TRIP RESET
    The knobs on the pressurization panel (the one where you select FLT ALT and LAND ALT)
    Nose gear well light
    Ignitor selector

    And you can daisy-chain all the landing light switches.

    ON THE OTHER HAND: If you connect ALL the switches, you do nothing wrong. I only left out some of the switches because my interface boards did not have enough inputs.

    And to answer more directly on your question: You might not have a CPL today. But what is the status in 5 years? 10 years? You might not have a CPL even then, but you COULD have the knowledge needed!

    Basically, you decide which level of realism you want to shoot for. The more realism, the more expensive. More realism, much more work.

    I find great pleasure in building the sim to a very high level of realism. I love to think about specific areas and plan how I am going to execute the build. Problem solving, learning new skills (welding, using glass fiber and epoxy to name just two) and the satisfaction when something I built MYSELF work the way it is supposed to.

    If you are going to spend that much money (yep, a 737 will set you back the average mid-range car), why would you have dummy switches if those particular switches could be connected to the sim?
    Flying a 737 sim from A to B can be fun. But what if you experience an engine failure? What if the auto throttle is "inop" that day?

    About a year ago, I got the opportunity to sit in the cockpit on a real 737, on the foldable jumpseat. That was the most fun I've had on an aircraft ever! Not only because it was cool to be in the cockpit in flight. Nor because seat "0D" (Captain is 0A, F/O 0B, jump seat 0C in this picture) offers the third best view in the whole plane. But mostly because I could follow the workflow of the pilots, I knew how to adjust the audio panel so that I could hear ATC, the markers and the nav beacons morse code. I could read the displays and know where we was at the moment, the ground speed, the wind heading and so on. And I knew which switches do what, so I could "monitor" the F/O cleaning up the panels after landing.

    You learn a lot, and you should build the sim as realistic as you can - at least for the panels. Spend the time, effort and money on the items you are going to use the most. The rest is gravy.

    Most important: This is not a speed race. It is a slow marathon. A project without any end, growing more sophisticated and realistic as time goes by.

    Invest in a good quality MIP (Main instrument panel, or dashboard) and the glare shield with the EFIS and AP panel. Not only will you get airborne quickly, but the MIP will give you a LOT of help figuring out measurements, angles and so on; in your build. Don't save your money here. You can look for cheaper options for the radio panels, the seats or the aft overhead. But not the things you are going to use and touch the most!

  5. Thanks manhattan thanked for this post
  6. #4
    300+ Forum Addict manhattan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Plymouth UK
    Posts
    347
    Contribute If you enjoy reading the
    content here, click the below
    image to support MyCockpit site.
    Click Here To Contribute To Our Site

    Re: NEW BUILDER for the 737....

    Duplicated in error.

  7. #5
    300+ Forum Addict manhattan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Plymouth UK
    Posts
    347
    Contribute If you enjoy reading the
    content here, click the below
    image to support MyCockpit site.
    Click Here To Contribute To Our Site

    Re: NEW BUILDER for the 737....

    Hi Vidarf.

    I am now ready to build my 737 overhead but I am not sure what 'interface boards' I should use? I have a Hagstrom KE72 emmulator for my switches, but find that after re-booting for another flight, the switches sometimes read 'on' instead of 'off' or the other way around and they don't keep their previous configuration? This could be a characteristic of the KE72 which is why I ask your advice on 'interface boards' Having to re-set the whole overhead before each flight, could be a bit tiresome!!

    Hoping you can help.

    TONY. Plymouth UK

  8. #6
    150+ Forum Groupie


    jonesthesoftware's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    aberdare, south wales UK
    Posts
    276
    Contribute If you enjoy reading the
    content here, click the below
    image to support MyCockpit site.
    Click Here To Contribute To Our Site

    Re: NEW BUILDER for the 737....

    Hi Tony
    as a suggestion can you fly your simulation from "cold and dark" for a complete trip making note of what switches you need throughout? This would give you a starting point of a minimum of equipment to build/connect first, so you can fly with some realism. (Don't know what software you are using)

    I would have no hesitation in recommending Open Cockpit cards for your whole cockpit. They are so easy to install and use via the SIOC software and have every type of component covered from switches, encoders, servos etc. The best decision I made when I started mine was to use these cards. Yes, you need to learn some programming to configure SIOC but that applies to whatever hardware/software route you use. Most of what you need to do can be found on various cockpit websites and SIOC is covered in great detail by Nico Kaan here
    Nico Kaan's Boeing 767 Flight Simulator with Opencockpits SIOC and lekseecon

    Making the right decision before you make or buy anything can save you hours of frustration and hundreds of pounds. As others have already said take the pleasure in making as much as possible yourself. It's a fantastic hobby which will keep you busy for years to come.
    ENJOY!

    kind regards
    geoff