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  1. #1
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    DC-9-32 Air Canada Cockpit

    I have been reading, but have been absent from posting, figuring I'd wait until I had a worthwhile update other than "I bought a part". At this point, I'm so happy to announce that I am virtually completely done with buying pieces (except for cockpit trim moldings), and can now work on building the structures. I'm going to build the structure first, then work on the networking so that I can run the wiring down through the structure, likely through a series of aluminum tubes.

    http://i19.photobucket.com/albums/b1...0111129_12.jpg

    http://i19.photobucket.com/albums/b1...0111129_13.jpg

    http://i19.photobucket.com/albums/b1...20111129_3.jpg

    Great progress, and probably 80% of this will be reconnecting screw holes. I have metal coming in from the shop today that will allow me to hopefully work on creating the cockpit sidewalls and the flooring. I'll post pictures as able.

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  3. #2
    300+ Forum Addict notgotaclue's Avatar
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    Re: DC-9-32 Air Canada Cockpit

    Hi.
    Let the fun (and the shouting and swearing) begin....
    It is a good job I don't have a swear box whilst I put my pit together - I wont have any money for parts.
    Allan.

  4. #3
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    Re: DC-9-32 Air Canada Cockpit

    I've actually been collecting for two years. I haven't seen a reason to post pictures of the development, as it is essentially what I termed my "NTSB Crash Investigation Hangar". The thing had really nothing other than parts.

    Now we are finally getting to the point where things will start coming together in an organized form, and I'm hoping that soon after I can look into the possibility of networking/interfacing as well as the structurebuilding. My biggest priority is "my side" (Left seat), which I have almost all the parts for...and am hoping with Christmas around the corner that I can finish the overhead or get the fire handle section done.

    I'm hoping to make it more worthwhile with future posts.
    Jon

  5. #4
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    Re: DC-9-32 Air Canada Cockpit

    Took some more time to work on the project since I've not had a lot of time to really do much with my "baby".

    The upper level flight deck is secured on both sides, and there is a third bar that will secure the rudder pedal covers and also provide the forward supports for both the pedestal and the forward flooring. From here I hope to start on the lower floor level and the walkways next. From here I am hoping to develop the structure and integrate the upper and lower levels and work on developing each piece into a solidly organized structure and start building from the floor up on that.

    As far as the main instrument panel, the photos are of a slightly older variant (mid May to be exact). Instrumentation is complete except for a single Wakmann clock. The framework is missing a few Korry light covers, one Korry light (for the Slat Extend light), and also one light block for the speed command annunciator missing as well. Even the glareshield is nearly completely finished, and is authentic to Air Canada even!!

    The pedestal is completely finished, and is authentic to an Air Canada DC-9 after being outfitted with the ACARS system. Floors have been stripped and repainted in the authentic Douglas Blue-Green, and it finally looks like the single aircraft, rather than a "mix mash" of the components.

    And last, the overhead has had some progression and is nearing completion. The cabin pressure indicator has been fitted with the MD80 style (as seen in Air Canada DC-9s throughout their life), and I have finished creation of the DC-9 AC Crosstie indicator, mechanic call light, and also received the overhead speaker and engine sync pieces are in their rightful place.
    8Jun1.jpg
    8Jun2.jpg
    8Jun3.jpg
    8Jun4.jpg
    8Jun5.jpg

  6. #5
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    Re: DC-9-32 Air Canada Cockpit

    Hey that's looking great, you have an impressive collection of real parts! I assume you will be interfacing those nifty analog radio heads? PM me if you need any help, I am using analog heads on my sim as well and have so far interfaced a Gables NAV head (I have a second NAV and a transponder to interface as well, soon as I get around to it).

    "Almost like real" is great, but there's nothing like actually having REAL.

    Matt

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  8. #6
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    Re: DC-9-32 Air Canada Cockpit

    I will definitely be needing help. I'm learning a lot of this on the fly, and I KNOW it's possible. It's just a matter of doing it.

    I'm absolutely amazed with how much I've learned from acquiring real pieces though too. Most of the DC-9 pieces simplify down to pulleys, and I had thought about using a series of slide potentiometers (decided against that though....but it's still incredible to see how the setup goes).

    There are only two pieces that I'm thinking I will have to substitute fake pieces for: The sidewall and the framework for the overhead panel. I am hoping to have some professional work done for the framework for the overhead, as it's around 35kg (80lbs)....and I don't want to chance someone making a crappy weld or rely on screws to hold them in. lol.

    I have a buddy helping to try to locate sidewall pieces though, as I'm really wanting to go THAT road instead and carry on the "tradition" of mostly real pieces. The best part is that I was very lucky to have coincidentally located a number of Air Canada pieces without even having dedicated myself to the aircraft. The seats were located first, back when I initially planned on doing a MD-80 project, and I was going to redye them in American Airlines colors and paint over the DC-9-32 only sticker. The glareshield was located next (when I decided to do the DC-9-30 after hearing that there was a new one in development for FSX), and I had plans to remove the overshield annunciators and other things, but then got my main panel from a guy I deal with, and it was Air Canada as well. From there, I started trying to do an Air Canada DC-9, even though I had wanted to do a Northwest Airlines bird.

    I've definitely fallen in love with Air Canada DC-9s though, so it's fun.
    Jon