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  1. #1
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    Dual Rudder Pedels help! Air Cadets

    Hi there please reply if you can help,
    we are a group of youngsters aged 13-18 in the Air Training Corps in England
    we are working on a project to replicate one of the aircraft we fly The Grob Tutor
    we have a few concerns with the mechanical and practical sides of creating the sim- naturally due to our lack of experience. although we do have a dual stick prototype made

    one main thing is the dual rudder pedals.

    we want the dual movement so the cadets can actually follow through with the movements of the instructor a basic method we practise to allow the cadets to get a feel of the sensitivity of the controls on their first flight. we would also need a solution to interface it with fs2004. possibly by connecting a pot. on one of the pedals?

    has anyone done this cheaply and easily? Please help out as we are eager to join your sim community. does anyone have any photos suggestions or just ideas- help inspire us!
    Thanks

  2. #2
    Executive Assistant Geremy Britton's Avatar
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    Re: Dual Rudder Pedels help! Air Cadets

    Using gas struts or pistons, create a movement which can be replicated at the otherside. For example a bicycle pump which when one side is pushed down the other side pushes up.

    Springs is also a possibility.

    You are correct about using pots, using a leo bodnar card you could easilly hook these up to flight sim.

    Regards
    Geremy Britton
    Executive Assistant, MyCockpit Inc
    Head of GLB Flight Products
    www.geremy.co.uk

  3. #3
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    Re: Dual Rudder Pedels help! Air Cadets

    You might take a look at the Grob Tutor maintenance manual if one's available. It should give you an idea of how the pedals are linked. Alternatively, take a look inside the plane, though I don't know how much of the mechanism is visible.

    For illustrations of Cessna and Piper pedal linkages see: http://www.mikesflightdeck.com/oldne...news_2007.html Scroll down to the June entries.

    Create a solution based on what's in a real plane. I suggest using steel tubing and welding the pieces together. While there are less expensive approaches, I think you'll need the strength.

    Hmmm, a totally off the cuff thought is to use 1/2" steel pipe and threaded joints. (I'm imagining a set up similar to the Cessna linked pedals without toe brakes.) Use epoxy to lock the joints, or drill through the assembled joints and use a bolt to keep the joint from rotating. Use a steel cable wrapped around a pulley to connect the left-pedal assembly to the right-pedal assembly. The pulley gives you a good place to mechanically couple the potentiometer. You can use high density polyethylene (HDP) to make bearings to support the pipes. HDP is often used to make food cutting boards. Sometimes a plastic supplier will have scrap for sale cheap. If you can't find a local supplier, you can always buy a cutting board.

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    Re: Dual Rudder Pedels help! Air Cadets

    Following Mikes train of thought on the threaded steel tube:

    Maybe you could use galvanised electrical conduit and fittings - An electrician may be able to help you with that. Industrial electricians usually have the dies to cut new threads when you have the lengths cut as you want them.


    Rob

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    Re: Dual Rudder Pedels help! Air Cadets

    thanks every1 really good links and inspiring ideas
    cheers
    FS team

  6. #6
    300+ Forum Addict Shawn's Avatar
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    Re: Dual Rudder Pedels help! Air Cadets

    Just a couple of photo's to give you some more ideas.





    And the pedals that I built. I'm waiting on one more dampener.


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  8. #7
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    Re: Dual Rudder Pedels help! Air Cadets

    thanks very much what is that part called where it connects the threaded screw from the pedal to the pivot point? I've tried to soldier a nut to a threaded screw but deosnt work well, didn't know you could buy them!

  9. #8
    300+ Forum Addict Shawn's Avatar
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    Re: Dual Rudder Pedels help! Air Cadets

    Usually they are just called rod end connectors, or rod end bearing. The one's I use would be female rod end connectors. Just watch as most rod end connectors are metric thread and most threaded rod that is readily available is standard, at least where I shop.

    Shawn

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