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    737-800 - T/O to Climb

    Hi Guys,

    A quick question for all you 737 drivers. What degree of pitch do you use on take-off? I use about 8 till clear of a tail strike. What degree do you use after initial takeoff to avoid tail strike? I go from 8 degrees to approx 14 for the initial climb out to around 5,000' and then switch to LNAV. Any ideas would be welcome. I can't find any particular specs on this part of the takeoff and climb.

    Thanks

    Rob

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    Re: 737-800 - T/O to Climb

    From the real manual:

    ROTATION AND LIFTOFF
    As the airspeed approaches V1, the slight forward control column pressure is
    relaxed to neutral, allowing for a smooth rotation to begin at VR.
    At VR, rotate smoothly with one continuous motion approximating, but no more
    than 2.5 degrees/sec. Using the normal rotation rate, the aircraft flies off the
    runway as the pitch attitude increases, and a runway to fuselage clearance of
    approximately 20 inches results.
    Rotate initially toward a 15-degree attitude. This will result in an airspeed of
    approximately V2 + 20 knots. Initially, the Flight Director will command 15
    degrees nose up. However, the F/D pitch command will not be used during
    rotation. Indicated airspeed and vertical speed are the primary instruments.
    After the radio altitude and vertical speed increase, the Pilot Flying will adjust
    pitch to coincide with F/D input. This pitch command under normal situations
    will be V2 + 20 knots. The Flying Pilot will maintain the F/D input of V2 + 20
    until reaching initial flap retraction altitude.
    At light gross weights, an initial climbout at V2 + 20 will produce an excessive
    deck angle. A slight difference between aircraft symbol and F/D pitch
    command will be necessary to not exceed 25 degrees of pitch. This pitch limit
    is for passenger comfort. The F/D pitch command will become synchronized
    with the aircraft symbol as the flaps are retracted during acceleration to clean
    maneuvering speed.

    737 Sec. 3 Page 115
    Flight Manual Continental Rev. 11/15/02 #41

    Because the aircraft is geometrically limited, it cannot be rotated to a body angle
    that will prevent it from becoming airborne with takeoff thrust. Premature
    rotation will probably result in the aircraft becoming airborne before the normal
    liftoff point, and at a slower than normal speed. Since this speed will be
    considerably below the best angle of climb speed, the initial climb profile may
    be greatly reduced.
    The aircraft has a very low angle of attack on the ground in three-point attitude.
    Delaying rotation (waiting for the aircraft to “Fly Itself” off the ground) will
    increase the liftoff distance considerably.
    The airspeed indicator will lag momentarily during rotation due to the vertical
    movement of the static ports relative to the direction of flight as the nose is
    lifted.
    When a positive rate of climb has been verified on the IVSI and altimeter, either
    pilot will call, “POSITIVE RATE.” When a positive rate of climb is confirmed,
    the Pilot Flying will call “GEAR UP,” stabilize airspeed at V2 + 20 knots, and
    transition to the F/D pitch command.
    In roll, the F/D commands wings level to 400 feet RA, then selected bank angle
    limit to the selected heading when a new roll mode is selected.
    Selection of pitch and roll modes other than TOGA are inhibited below 400 feet
    RA.
    During takeoff or initial climb, if a center tank LOW PRESSURE light(s)
    illuminates, the center tank pump(s) may remain on until the climb attitude is
    reduced and the light(s) extinguishes or workload allows for the pump(s) to be
    positioned to OFF. When established in a level attitude at cruise, if the center
    tank contains usable fuel and the center tank switches are off, center tank pump
    switches may be positioned to ON again. Verify the LOW PRESSURE light
    extinguish and position both switches to OFF when both LOW PRESSURE lights
    illuminate.

    Sec. 3 Page 116 737
    Rev. 11/15/02 #41 Continental Flight Manual

    B737 TAIL STRIKE AVOIDANCE
    Analysis of tail strike incidents involving Boeing transport aircraft show that
    certain common factors often play a role in these mishaps. Several not so
    obvious factors can contribute to a tail strike as well.
    Takeoff
    During takeoff, the amount of tail clearance achieved for a given flap setting is a
    function of airspeed at rotation and rate of rotation. Normal pitch attitude at
    liftoff is only 3° to 4° less than the attitude at which aft body contact with the
    runway will occur. For optimum takeoff and initial climb performance, initiate
    a smooth continuous rotation at VR toward 15 degrees of pitch. Rotate smoothly
    at an average rate of 2 ½ degrees/second. This rate will result in liftoff of the
    aircraft at a body attitude of between 7 and 10°, depending upon the B737
    model flown. The flight director pitch command is not used for rotation. The
    point of minimum ground clearance occurs slightly after liftoff, as the aircraft
    pitch attitude continues to increase towards 15°.
    Grant D.
    Nelson,B.C. Canada
    Win7 32bit, FSX, PM Boeing, TH2GO, GEX, VoxATC

  3. #3
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    Re: 737-800 - T/O to Climb

    Hi,

    Thanks Grant. I should read the whole manual! I'm pretty conversant with general knowledge and now it's time to refine that knowledge.

    Rob

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