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  1. #1
    150+ Forum Groupie Jake 747 400's Avatar
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    Air France No Survivors

    Im am very sorry to say, here in the uk the news has been on to report, the aircraft has not been found, but it said their will be no survivors.
    Very sad.

    Jake
    Boeing 744ever jakes747sim.webs.com

  2. #2
    Executive Vice President, MyCockpit


    Matt Olieman's Avatar
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    That would be very sad.

    This is very strange, I don't know what altitude they were, being struck by lightning, then having electrical failure, which I believe is rare.

    When an airplane is hit by lightning, the plane is like a bubble, the electrical charge passes around it or travels over the surface, not penetrating. Normally if an aircraft is hit by lightning, as I just described, it is caused by air to air lightning. Aircrafts do not attract lightning, if hit, the aircraft just happens to be in the path of that bolt.

    The other thing that makes the theory of the alleged lightening strike so rare, is the system redundancy in the aircraft. For all systems to fail, at the same time is extremely rare.

    Just my thoughts, and therefore I hope the aircraft made a water landing and there are survivors.

    Matt Olieman

  3. #3
    1000+ Poster - Fantastic Contributor Jackpilot's Avatar
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    So do I.....
    Jackpilot
    B737-700 Posky
    FS9/P.Magenta
    without PMSystem

  4. #4
    150+ Forum Groupie
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    According to what I've found on the internet, the aircraft was flying at 35.000 ft. This is normally above the weather, however tropical thunderstorms in that area could build up until 50.000 ft.

    The crew was experienced, the captain having +11.000 hours, the FO +6.000.

    In the mean time we can only hope that they landed on the water and hope that the rescue teams find the Airbus and solve this mistery.


    Wendy

  5. #5
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    The following information comes from aviation-safety.net.

    Wendy

    Date: 01 JUN 2009
    Time: ca 00:15
    Type: Airbus A330-203
    Operator: Air France
    Registration: F-GZCP
    C/n / msn: 660
    First flight: 2005-02-25 (4 years 3 months)
    Total airframe hrs: 18870
    Engines: 2 General Electric CF6-80E1A3
    Crew: Fatalities: 12 / Occupants: 12
    Passengers: Fatalities: 216 / Occupants: 216
    Total: Fatalities: 228 / Occupants: 228
    Airplane damage: Missing
    Location: Atlantic Ocean (Atlantic Ocean)
    Phase: En route (ENR)
    Nature: International Scheduled Passenger
    Departure airport: Rio de Janeiro-Galeao International Airport, RJ (GIG/SBGL), Brazil
    Destination airport: Paris-Charles de Gaulle Airport (CDG/LFPG), France
    Flightnumber: 447
    Narrative:
    An Air France Airbus A330-200 went missing on transatlantic flight from Rio de Janeiro-Galeao International Airport, RJ (GIG) to Paris-Charles de Gaulle Airport.
    The airplane carried 12 crew members an 216 passengers. Flight AF447 departed at 19:03 local time (May 31) from Rio de Janeiro (GIG).
    Last radio contact with the flight was at 01:33 UTC. The crew was in contact with the Atlantic Area Control Centre (CINDACTA III) when the flight reported over the INTOL waypoint, estimating TASIL at 02:20 UTC. INTOL is an RNAV waypoint located in the Atlantic Ocean, 565 km from Natal, Brazil. The TASIL waypoint is located 1228 kilometers from Natal. TASIL is at the border of the Recife FIR and Dakar Oceanic FIR.
    At 01:48 UTC the aircraft went out of the radar coverage of CINDACTA III, Fernando de Noronha. Information indicated that the aircraft flew normally at FL350 and a speed of 453 kts.
    The aircraft reportedly went through a thunderstorm with strong turbulence at 02:00 UTC. An automated message was delivered by 02:14 UTC indicating a loss of pressurization and failure in the electrical system, the Brazilian Ministry of Defence reported.
    A search was initiated by Brazilian authorities at 05:33 UTC.

    The airplane has not yet been found; the fatality index is feared, not confirmed.

  6. #6
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    I believe Matt is correct with his statement on the effects of lightning strikes on an aircraft.

    However, there are some positions where a lightning strike can be fatal.
    Eg, wing tip fuel vents. (If the A330 has them) and ground power hookups.

    Doesn't the average airliner get hit by lightning 4 times every year? Im sure I remember that from somewhere.

    Tom.

  7. #7
    MyCockpit Support Staff dodiano's Avatar
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    Airbus

    I have been struck by lightning couple of times at least 3 times and trust me never have loss our Electrical system... When the lightning hits basically it is diffused by the fuselage and the energy goes out in the wings via the small like sticks that are installed in the wings I simply can't remember the name! Total of 13 per wing in the A=320 plus five on the Tail...
    Now I have flown under those types of storms they are very typical in south america and teh caribbean as well as like those you can feel in Florida or flying to Texas... Read a report that the pilot said they went into severe turbulence and that they loss Electrical power trust me an Airbus in Electrical Emergency configuration and in severe Turbulence wouldn't want to be there... Then again If I hear soemthign from our safety department I'll sure post it here... This has been a really sad year for aviation...

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  9. #8
    75+ Posting Member rhysb's Avatar
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    Static Discharge Ports is the word your looking for I think Robert? Only thing that confuses me over this is for example the 767 has a bunch of Static discharge ports along the wing but also uses a shielded cable system to make sure lightning is grounded and does not effect the electrical system by blocking an EMP.
    Unfortunately im no expert in this I only know how to fly them! But everything to me points to some sort of avionics fire as it just seems to catastrophic and too quick to be an electrical problem.

    My thoughts go out to the families though and you never wish to hear or see anything like this happening.

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  11. #9
    Mycockpit, Inc. CTO Deesystems's Avatar
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    Air France

    Sounds like they might of have found wreckage,,

    My condolences got out to the Family's


    D

  12. #10
    MyCockpit Support Staff dodiano's Avatar
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    Airbus

    STATIC DISCHARGE PORT!! THANKS!!!!! Yes I think you are right it would suggest that if they had an electrical failure a Fire could be very catastrophic and will render the plane unflyable specially the Airbus... They have found some of teh wreckage apparenttly.... THis is really sad!

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